About LaShelle

You’re reading this because I once drove past a dying rabbit in the middle of the road. It amazes me how the simplest of events can completely change the course of your life, but it happened to me, and here we are.

Coming home from work one evening, I saw a rabbit lying in the road, kicking with one foot, unable to move out of traffic. While I was debating whether to stop and do something, I missed my chance to pull over. I immediately kicked myself in the mental shins and turned around to look for the rabbit. By the time I reached the spot where I’d last seen her, the rabbit was gone–probably another critter’s dinner.

I spent that evening being bothered by the encounter, wishing I’d had a way to help the rabbit, or even communicate with it. After Googling around, looking for things like “how to help an injured animal” and “how to talk to animals,” I discovered a woman near me who gave classes on animal communication. As luck would have it, she had a class coming up. You can read about my experience in that first class here.

Although I had a sense then that being an animal communicator might be in my future, the idea was so far-fetched and preposterous that I immediately rejected it in epic fashion, opting instead to go to veterinary school. Reason seemed like a much better career choice than intuition. In spite of that, I continued to take animal communication classes, read books about it, and practice here and there with friends’ animals. I also learned energy healing techniques, such as Reiki and EFT.

During my fourth year of veterinary school, my carefully reasoned plan flew out the window after a string of tragedies, including the sudden death of my husband. It was easily the worst period of my life, and it completely altered the way I exist in the world. I now have a visceral understanding of how short and precious life is, which gives one the sort of bravery (or foolishness) needed to “come out” as an animal communicator, despite being a rational, level-headed scientist. That period of time also greatly heightened my intuition, and I had dozens of profound experiences that had no rational explanation.

After veterinary school, I began my veterinary practice specializing in acupuncture and herbal medicine, and completed a year-long apprenticeship in animal communication with Terri O’Hara. Though I keep my work as a veterinarian and an animal communicator separate, there is some overlap—I rely on intuition in my practice, where it augments, rather than replaces traditional veterinary care.  I also use my experience as a veterinarian to better understand the information I receive as an animal communicator.

The joy of both veterinary medicine and animal communication for me is being able to make a profound difference in the lives of animals and their humans. Perhaps you will be one of them, thanks to a little rabbit!